Younger bust

Portrait by Kim Marchesseault Portrait by Kim Marchesseault

Here is the continuation of the previous portrait since I have changed models.  I learned a lot about the differences in the ages of faces by changing from an older woman in her fifties to a younger model of age fifteen. The area around the mouth in particular, the jaw line and they eye areas are so very different.  In a younger person, the eye sockets are more filled. The mouth is full. The muscles around the mouth are plump. The Jaw line is cleaner.

Teenagers are lazy! That’s the most important lesson. I have to wrestle this girl (my daughter) out of bed at two in the afternoon. She gets to sit there and read a book, but she’d prefer to lie down.

Advertisements

Hope Dolphins

"Hope Dolphins" by Kim MarchesseaultI am  commissioned to sculpt a pair of dolphins with special meaning that will be given as a gift. They represent hope. One of the dolphins is slightly smaller and following behind a  larger dolphin."Hope Dolphins" by Kim MarchesseaultThese images are of the maquette for the final piece, which will be done in black clay.

"Hope Dolphins" by Kim Marchesseault

Should you, Could you, Would you Paint the Wood?

IMG_2 1179My guardian poodle should be out there biting the ankles of my enemies however, he prefers to dabble in fine art instead.  Here’s an installation work of Pood’s called “someone rang the doorbell right after the front door was painted” .

I’m so fortunate to have such a talented companion here for inspiration. Pood is also an unbelievable  percussionist. You should hear him rattle his stainless steel bowls whenever they’re empty.

His humanitarian efforts include providing a well groomed, warm place to live for about half a dozen otherwise homeless fleas right now, (despite my best efforts).

p.s. Bill, you can see what I’ve been working on lately. My humble contribution is called “Maple Hardwood Floors”.

And then one day …it happened

"And Then One Day....It Happened" by Charles Brouwer -Photo by Kim Marchesseault 

Charlie Brouwer, sculptor of “And then one day …it happened” said “Recently most of my outdoor sculptures have been human figures. The ideas for them come from my personal experiences. Occasionally I experience, or think something that seems to resonate with meaning going beyond my personal life and I turn it into a sculpture. I hope viewers will recognize in these figures something of what it means to be human.

 

I make them out of locust wood that grows in the Blue Ridge Mountains where I live.  Locust has been the traditional wood of choice for fence posts because it is extremely hard and very resistant to weather and rot. This also makes it a good material for outdoor sculptures. 

For each sculpture I use some locust directly from logs and limbs, and some that has been cut into lumber by sawmills. Together they suggest the way we humans seem to be both part of nature and products of our own invention.

 

We live in a difficult era – humans and the earth are in trouble on every front. I cannot make art without thinking about this situation. 

I find myself asking – how should we live, what should we do, what is beautiful, true, good, and important now?”

 

The wood looks wonderfully faded to almost white with a striding figure at the base undergoing a sudden metamorphosis -becoming a ladder reaching toward the sky.

I love philosophy in sculpture. I’m so lucky to have these close to my house.

I didn’t have the privilege of watching the installation process of this piece in the Cary Sculpture Exhibit so I took pictures afterward.  Here are a couple of handy tips for photographing sculpture.

1. Do not eat king crab legs the night before you take pictures no matter how succulent and delicious they look. The little spiky things in the shells poke into your finger tips and it’s really painful the next day when you’re trying to press the buttons on your camera.

2. Bring something to brush off bird poo from the sculptures with. I wish someone had said something to me before I went! Instead I had to use my hand.

3. Wear old clothes for rolling around in the dirt and grass.  Check your hair for grass, dirt and insects *before* you meet someone for lunch.

4. Don’t panic when the person in the office behind the sculpture you’re photographing looks wide eyed at you from their window and suddenly closes the blinds. At this point there’s still a good chance they won’t actually report you to the police as a stalker.

A rock and a hard face

stone carving by Kim Marchesseault I worked some on the hair, the face and began shaping the hand of this lady in limestone. 

I’m working at home now. An area of my deck has a roof over it and a work bench strong enough to hold this rock. My tools are three chisels and a hammer.

When I stop being brutally critical of myself-  stone carving by Kim Marchesseault 21934just relax and the work flows. Click to enlarge.

 

This is part six of the series on this stone carving.

Part 5: Digging deeper

Part 4: Little bit older and a lot less boulder

Part 3: Fo shizzel my chizzel

Part 2: The cure for stonliness is a friend with a chisel

Part 1: Turned to stone

Fo Shizzel My Chizzel

 

stone carving_0101 

Second day carving this stone and I am having a blast. My teacher, Paris Alexander,taught me to use a point chisel to clear out more stone and to do some shaping with a tooth chisel. I was supposed to round out the tip of the nose (/me points to the square flat thing which is not rounded in the middle of the face) but I was bad and got distracted playing around with the rest of the face. He really has his work cut out for him, being stuck with me as a student. I can hardly wait till next week.

Part 1:  Turned to Stone -preliminary sketch for this sculpture

Part 2: The Cure for Stonliness is a Friend with a Chisel – image transfer and initial carving

Turned to stone

stonecarving by Kim Marchesseault Here is my preliminary pencil sketch for my first attempt at relief carving in limestone.

This sketch was my second choice of the two designs I came up with. My instructor gently advised me that my first choice is too difficult for my skill level at this time.

The method of image transfer we used involved punching holes through the lines of the sketch with a nail and rubbing blue chalk into the nail holes. I didn’t punch deeply enough so only a few blue dots showed up on my stone, but they were enough to use as points of reference and fortunately I was able to quickly redraw the image in pencil on the limestone.

My instructor is Paris Alexander, a well known artist living in the Raleigh area. He seems at peace with himself, which makes taking this class from him an absolute pleasure.